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 On this page are inserted links to the description of the:       Cine Cameras; ProjectorsArticlesUnusual Cine ItemsNews from the Cine World;   Links to other Web Sites ; Cine Dictionary
 

 

          Cine Cameras:      9,5 mm;                         8 mm;                      16 mm ;            35 mm Arriflex & others;              

                                                            9,5 mm cameras

 

         Page 1
- Pathe Baby Hand turned cameras (2)- - Pathe Baby - Motrix automatic  (2)
- Pathe Baby - Camo automatic  (2)
- Baby Cine Posograph
- Pathe Motocamera (7)
- Pathe Motocamera “De Luxe” (2)
- Pathe Motocamera Model B (3)
- Pathe Motocamera Model H (8)
- Pathe Motocamera 1949 Model National II
- Pathe Motocamera 1954 National II
- Pathe Webo “A” - 1948
- Pathe Webo “A” Lux
- Pathe Webo “M”  (2)
- Pathe Webo ‘M’ Reflex
- Pathe Lido
- Pathescope ‘Prince ’ (3)
- Pathescope ‘PAT’
- Pathe Webo ‘Rio

 

             Page 2
- Campro camera & projector
- Dekko Bakelite - Standard Model 1935 (7)
- Dekko Model 104
- Dekko Model 104 De luxe
- Dekko Model De Luxe 1939
- Eumig Model  C 1939
- Eumig Bakelite - Model C1 - 1931 (2)













 

              Page 3
 - Ercsam Camex
- Ercsam Camex Model V.U
- Coronet Model A 1932
- Coronet Model A; in the original box (2)
Coronet Model B 1936
Coronet Model C 1938
- Ditmar Photocell Model (2)
- Ditmar Model with exposure meter
- Ditmar spool Model 1936
- Nizo Model F 1929 (2)










 

           Page 4
 - Alef Model A 1932
- Cine Nizo Model K - 1932-1933
- Cine Nizo Model M - 1933
- Beaulieu Model C9 - 1951
- Ciegel Super HL
 -
Miller 9,5mm Model B de Luxe















 

                                                                               8 mm cameras

 

            Page 1
- Eumig Servomatic double 8 mm
- Zenit Quarz 1x8S -2 Super 8 mm
- Blaupunkt Model E- 8 (3 cameras)
- Geva 8 Carena - slim camera
- Carena 2 Gevaert
- Emel Model C94
- “LD8” with turret - 1958
- “LD8” ZOOM Reflex
- Bolex Paillard Model H8
- Keystone Model K-8 - 1936
- Keystone Model K-35 - Olympic
- Cine Nizo model SO

                   Page 2
- Beaulieu Model 4008 ZM
- Beaulieu Model President
-Agfa Model Movex 8 and- Model 8- L (5)
- Admira 8F (3)
- Agfa Family Model 1980
- Movikon K 8 Zeiss Ikon
- Movikon 8 Zeiss Ikon
- Movinette 8 B

                   Page 3
- Bolex Paillard Model D8L
- Bolex Paillard Model B 8
- Bolex Paillard Model 581 Sound Marcozoom 1976
- Bolex Paillard Model Zoom Reflex P 3
- Bolex Paillard Model C 8
- Eumig Model C4 1937&1938
- Eumig Model C3 black 1953
- Eumig Model C3 green 1954 (x2)
- Eumig Model C3M 1960 (x3)
- Eumig Model C3R 1958
- Quartz Model 2M ca 1968
- Pathe Auto Camex Model K2
 

          Page 4
-Nizo Heliomatic 2 x 8 mm Model S2R (x4)
- Cine Nizo 8E models A & B
- Nizo AK 1x8 mm - 1949
- Nizo Heliomatic 2x8 mm Model Trifo

         
Page 4a
-  Nizo Heliomatic Focovario  x3
- Nizo Exposomat Model “R”
          
         
Page 5
- Yasica 8 - T2 1961
- Cine Canonet 8 - 1936
- Cine Kodak Eight Model 20
- Cine Kodak Eight Model 60
- Cannon Zoom Reflex 8 - 1959
- Cannon Zoom Reflex 8 -2
- Pathe DS8/BTL Double Super 8 Professional Reflex

 

                                                                             16 mm cameras

 

                    Page 1
 - Bell & Howell Camera 70 - Model A
- Bolex Paillard 1951
- Simens Kino-Kamera Model CII
- Simens Model D
- Simens Model D 1936
- Simens Model FII 1938
- Simens Model FII 1937
- Revere Model 38
- Bolex Paillard Model H16 - 1936
- Keystone Model K - 50

              Page 2
- Kinamo  Model S 10 - Carl Zeiss Ikon
- Simplex Pockette 1935
- Simplex WD - 1942
- Kinamo  Model S 10
- Kodak Model K - 1930
- Cine-Kodak Model E -1937-

- Cine-Kodak Magazine - 1936
- Cine-Kodak Magazine 16 - 1945 (x2)

               Page 3  
- Movikon K 16 Zeiss Ikon 1938
-
Movikon 16 Zeiss Ikon 1935
 - Agfa Movex 12-16 B 1928
- Agfa Movex 30 B 1935
- G.B. Bell & Howell Autoload 603 1952
- Simens Model B 1932 (x2)
- Ditmar Model with Optical Exposure Meter 1936/1937

                  Page 4
- Keystone Model A9 1948
- Stewart Warner Model 531 B 1931
- Pathe Super - spare parts
- GiC 16 1948


                  Page 5
- Ensign Auto Kinecam
- AK 16 DDR

                                                                              35 mm cameras

 Page 1 - - Arriflex Camera Prod Number 1707; -  Arriflex Camera Prod Number 1971;  - Kinamo N25 - ICA 35 mm, prod 1921

 

Projectors          8 mm;           9,5 mm;                8 mm 9,5 mm 16 mm;                16 mm;                Zeiss;                       Slide Projectors

                                                                                           8 mm Projectors

 

                   Page 1
- Agfa Movector 8
- Pathe Europ
- Prinz Magnon LV
- Nizo Familia Model 500
- Nizo Cinemator - 1958
- Bauer Model T10L
- Eumig Model P8 (x2)
- Eumig Model P8m
- Bolex Paillard 18-5 (x2)

                 Page 2
- Bolex Paillard Type M8
- Royal Cine GEL
- Silma 240S
- Ilford Elmo FP
- Bell & Howell Autoload 266 EX (x2)
- Bell & Howell Autoload 256 EX
- Sekonic Model 30C
- Silma S232 XL
- Hanimex Zoom
- Pathe Movie - Sonic
- Ericckson Cineric Model Monofilm Type F
- Weimar (1) std 8 mm

               Page 3
- Meopta 1947 - 1954
- Kodascope Eight Model 80 1934
 

               Page 4
- Simens Model 800 Type Sf. P 8.6  1966

                                                                                          9,5 mm Projectors

 

                 Page 1
- Eumig Model P1 -1599
- Pathescope Son MK2
- Ercsam Model Malex
- Cine GEL Royal
- Pathe Baby 60
- Ercsam Model Senior M50
- Pathe Baby 53 (x2)
- Pathescope Ace 9,5 mm
- Lapierre Model RL 50
- Sadar Handy (2x)
- Pathe Baby Vox
- Pathescope Ace Motor version
- Keystone E-948/2
- Royal Cine GEL

                    Page 2
 - Pathescope Model IMP 1935
Pathe Model designed by British Pats
- Pathe Baby 53
- Pathe Model Pathe-Lux version YD
- Pathe Model Merignan
- Pathescope Princess 1959

               Page 3
- Cineric Type F
- Dekko 1939; 1947; Junior- 3 project.
- Pathe Mirage
- Noris 1952
- Pathescope Kid 1929
- Coronet 1935
 

               Page 4
- Pathescope 200B 1933 (x3)
- Specto Standard - Type B

    8 mm 9,5 mm 16 mm Projectors;   Ditmar 8 mm & 9,5;        Bolex Paillard Model DA 9,5 mm &16 mm;         Royal Cine GEL 9,5 mm & 16 mm

                                                                          16 mm Projectors
Page 1;  
     Bell & Howell Gaumont Model 613;          Specto Type A;       Siemens Model 2000;      Kodak Kodascope Model C;       Ampro Model Imperial;                             Steward Warner Model 537- A;               B&H Model A 1655;       Pathe Joinville (x2);     B&H Model 2592;           B&H Model 1695 A (x2)
Page 2;      Kodascope Model K-75;                          Kodascope Model L;    Agfa Movector Jso 16;     Ampro Model Stylist - 1950
 

 Zeiss Projectors:     - Zeiss Ikon Model W26615 - 16 mm;   - Zeiss Ikon Movilux 8 mm 1959 ;   - Zeiss Ikon Kinox N375 - 16 mm ;
                   
                  - Zeiss Ikon Kinox W38553 - 16 mm;     - Zeiss Ikon 16 mm - 1943 (FL.);       -Zeiss Ikon - 16 mm - 1943;     - Zeiss Ikon Kinox S - 16 mm - 1939;
                  - Carl Zeiss Jena Model SK16 - 16 mm, Silent;            - Carl Zeiss Jena TK Model 16/501/A, Sound;            - Carl Zeiss Jena 16 mm Sound Projector

Slide Projectors;                                 - FilmStrip Projector - G.B. Model 38;                              - Ilford Elmo - Slide Projector Model CS

 

   Articles;                          - Arriflex Camera

 

 Unusual Cine Items; - Projector ACE 8 mm Prototype;  - Bauer P6 Studio 16 mm projector; - The system which was not accepted by the cine amateur

 

  Links to other web sites; http://www.pathefilm.uk/;             http://www.cinerdistan.co.uk/;
                                                     http://cinematographes.free.fr/index.html
 
News from the Cine World;                 
  Golden Jubilee - Group 9,5 in the UK   

 

 

Cine Dictionary
Film Formats (only in our collection).The primary characteristic of a film format is its size and shape:

- 9, 5 mm - Film width 9, 5 mm, image size 6, 5 x 8, 5 mm.  The 9.5 mm film is an amateur film format introduced by Pathé Frères in 1922 as part of the Pathé Baby amateur film system. It was conceived initially as an inexpensive format to provide copies of commercially made films to home users. The format uses a single, central perforation (sprocket hole) between each pair of frames. Silent and sound format.

8 mm (standard or known as regular 8 mm); silent and sound format.
 
-Super 8 mm (a larger image area because of its smaller perforation); silent and sound format;

16 mm (sound format with soundtrack),  extensively used in WWII and after, in fields: educational, governments, business, industrial, medicine;

- 35 mm - 35 mm film is the basic film gauge most commonly used for motion pictures, and remains relatively unchanged since its introduction in 1892 by William Dickson and Thomas Edison. The photographic film is cut into strips 35 millimeters (about 1 3/8 inches) wide. The standard negative pull down for movies ("single-frame" format) is four perforations per frame along both edges, which makes for exactly 16 frames per foot
.
Film gauge defines film width, traditionally the major film gauges in usage are: 9, 5 mm, 8 mm, 16 mm and 35 mm.

A film base, it is a transparent substrate which acts as a support medium for the photosensitive emulsion that lies atop it in numerous layers. In photographic terminology, the emulsion is the light sensitive coating supported by a base of cellulose nitrate or acetate which together form film.  Historically there have been three major types of film base in use:
- Nitrocellulose – flame able (cellulose nitrate);
- Cellulose acetate (cellulose triacetate);
- Polyester (polyethylene terephthalate) – PET; Kodak trade-name: ESTAR.

Types of films: two main types of film are available: negative and reversal.

Negative film producing negative image when it is developed in which black are white, white are black.                                            

Reversal film produces a positive image when it is developed, and a camera original can be projected without making a print. The best example of it is super 8 mm home movie film or slide film.

Film speed  is the measurement of film accumulation sensitivity to light. The film speed is named as EI – Exposure Index, or: ISO – International Standard Organization; ASA – American Standard Association; DIN – Deutsche Industries Norm. The lower EI number requires more light to obtain an exposure and is called slow film, the higher EI number requires less light to introduce film is called fast film.

Sprocket -Sprockets are used in the film transport mechanisms of movie projectors and movie cameras. In this case, the sprocket wheels engage film perforations in the film stock. Feed Sprocket - A driven sprocket which feds film from a compartment or magazine into a piece of mechanism such as camera, projector or sound camera. Take-up sprocket - A driven sprocket which moves film out of piece of film mechanism and into magazine or onto a spool at the completion of a process.

Claws the mechanism for transporting and to held the film precisely in place during exposure. The most popular are five types of film movements: Oscillating claws; Bolex double claws; Arriflex II; Mitchell movement and Bell & Howell movement.
More about on web site: http://www.sci.fi/~animato/movements/movements.html

Notched - The projection system is incorporated a way to save film on nonmoving titles. A notch in the film is recognized by the projector which would then project the frame for 10 seconds. By this method, 10 seconds of screen time was available for 1 frame of film, rather than the 140 frames required if the film was projected at the normal rate.

Fps the number of film frame per second.

Filming speed:  8; 16; 24; 25; 32 fps

Turret lens  a rotating device on a camera for bringing any of several lenses in front of the shutter.

Viewfinder  - An optical device forming part of a camera, or attached to it, which provides an image (usually magnified) approximating that which is formed by the lens on the film. Our cameras have two types of viewfinders: optical viewfinder or reflex viewfinder (reflex mirror at 45 degree angle).
Optical viewfinders- are built into the body of the camera. They show a reduced image of the subject. Two small marks indicate the framing for close range work where the effect of parallax is most apparent.
Reflex viewfinders-  by means of a tiny mirror (or silver paint - Arriflex camera) in the light path, provide a view of the subject through the actual taking lens. So image size, focus, and framing are seeing exactly as on the film
Parallax error
  –
arises because of the different position of viewfinder and taking lens. This difference is not noticeable when shooting at normal or long ranges. But when the subject is very close to the camera the viewfinder covers a slightly different area from that of the taking lens. The effect of parallax may be most easily seen by looking past a near object at a far object with the left and right eye alternately, the other eye being closed.
 
                                             Parallax error, 18% for web

Aperture
-
is a hole or an opening through which light travels. The aperture lens can be adjusted to control the amount of light reaching the film. In combination with variation of shutter speed, the aperture size will regulate the film's sensor's degree of exposure to light. Typically, a fast shutter speed will require a larger aperture to ensure sufficient light exposure, and a slow shutter speed will require a smaller aperture to avoid excessive exposure. The lens aperture is usually specified as an f-number, the ratio of focal length to effective aperture diameter. A lower f-number denotes a greater aperture opening which allows more light to reach the film or image sensor. The specifications for a given lens typically include the minimum and maximum apertures, such as for example f/22 - f/1.4. In this case f/22 is the smallest or minimum aperture opening, and f/1.4 is the widest or maximum aperture. Aperture values wider than f/2.8 are typically known as "fast" lenses. The fastest lenses in general production are f/1.2 or f/1.4, with more at f/1.8 and f/2.0, and many at f/2.8 slower.

Shutters - which exposes the film frame by frame to the light:  Film&shutter - 18% for web                                                                                                                
Telephoto lens
is a specific type of a long-focus lens in which the physical length of the lens is shorter than the focal length.