ban111

Home         Binoculars        Cine Collection         literature          About Us          Ask Expert         Items for Sale      FAQ        Contact

         

  

 

                                         Unusual     Pages   (1)   (2)   (3)   (4)   (5)   (6)   (7)   (8) (8a) (11)  (12)
                                                                        
                                                                            Page 5

    
                                            
Kriegsmarine Carl Zeiss – eug 10 x 80; 80 degrees 

                                                            I. Introduction

                                                            II. External features of the binocular – eug

                                                           III. Internal features of the binocular (

                                                           IV. Variation between early model - 1938 and later models

                                                          V. Accessories

I. Introduction

The binocular was the first one at the beginning of our collection.
10 x 80 binocular with angled eyepiece 80 ˚ is a very special construction high optical quality and is therefore particularly suitable for use at twilight and at night.
The binocular was produced by Carl Zeiss

 Jena, in Jena, and the first time was introduced in a catalogue December 1938.

10x80;80 Catalogue 1938 (2);30%


10 x 80 80˚ - picture from “German Military Technology: The Optical Equipment. Descriptive documents circulated by Carl Zeiss, Jena, between 1930 and 1940”; Edited by: Dr. Hans T.Seeger, Hamburg

As it was told in the catalogue; the binocular is constructed for anti aircraft observation and is also the simplest for target instruction and to set up the search lights due to the identified sites and elevation angel of the target.

During the war the binocular 10 x 80; 80 was produced in Warsaw as well by - Optische Präzisions-Werke G.m.b.H., Warschau and  marked “eug” from May 1941.
The model produced in Warsaw is a little different from the first model, produced in Jena.
It is wide field binocular; the field of view is: 122 m at 1000 m.  Exit pupil 8 mm.

Stephen Rohan in the book: “Eyes of the Wehrmacht An illustrated guide to the German World War II 10 x 80 binoculars” is describing the models 10 x 80; 80 ˚ with different markings:

-         blc “Flakfernrohr 10 x 80 Sonderausführung A”;

-         blc 10 x 80 M IV/I  with swastika;  and the binocular has two numbers: Nr.1046; 164882

-         eug 10 x80 M with swastika and one production number – 61544.

The above list we have to extend adding the model marked: ‘Carl Zeiss Jena’.
The model with early markings:  “Carl Zeiss Jena” from Stephen Rohan collection:

Carl Zeiss Jena 10x80;80dgr (8);30%
                              10x80; 80˚ Carl Zeiss Jena; prod No 68678 from Dr Stephen Rohan collection; Copyright: Dr Stephen Rohan

This binocular is extremely rare, because it has an inventory plate of Rechlin – the Luftwaffe Test Center, where the binocular was used.
You can find interesting information about the Luftwaffe Test Center, in the book: “The Luftwaffe War Diaries “by Cajus Bekker – first published in the German Language in 1964, under the title: “Angriffshöhe 4000”. Probably there are some other publications about the Center, but in our collection we have only one.
At present in Rechlin is a small Museum:  http://www.luftfahrttechnisches-museum-rechlin.de/ ;

And short history of that place, you can find:http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rechlin-L%C3%A4rz_Airfield#Post-war_history

Carl Zeiss Jena 10x80;80dgr (6);30%

                            10x80; 80˚ Carl Zeiss Jena; prod No 68678 from Dr Stephen Rohan collection; Copyright: Dr Stephen Rohan

Our binocular is eug model, with swastika and production number 61893.
It is difficult to establish the date of the 10 x 80; 80˚serial production. Presumably, it was 1938 when the binocular was introduced in the Carl Zeiss catalogue.
In our collection is other Carl Zeiss catalogue with the 10 x 80;80˚binocular, showing a little different picture and the texts arrangements.

10x80;80 Cat Nedinsko30%

                                                                          The Carl Zeiss Catalogue in our collection

10x80;80 Catalogue 1938;30%

                                                                             The Carl Zeiss Catalogue from December 1938

In both catalogues is specified a model 7 x 60; 80 degree, which has never been found by any collector known to us.
The 10 x 80; 80˚binocular was produced during the war in Carl Zeiss Jena – blc and in Warsaw by - Optische Präzisions-Werke G.m.b.H., Warschau and   marked “eug” from May 1941.
Before the war, in Warsaw, it was PZO factory. The name of the factory PZO was changed, by the German authority, into ‘Optische Präzisions-Werke GmbH’, from October 1939, as Carl Zeiss division.
More about in the article: “The history of 6x30 binoculars H.Kolberg and PZO” - Chapter 13 (binoculars site).
 http://www.binoculars-cinecollectors.com/
In the period - since October 1939 and May 1941, when was production of the binoculars in Warsaw, we have not seen 10x80; 80˚ marked OPW. If a binoculars collector owns that model, we will be pleased to hear.
The eug production was continuing to the August 1944.

II. External features of the binocular eug

In this picture our binocular is in full “equipment”, ready to be used. This model was completely and professionally  serviced by Terry Vacani as well. 
eug 10x80 80dgr with logo;40%


                                       10 x 80 80˚eug - production number: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

Let’s look at the external features of the binocular, the first will be described the sight.
The auxiliary sight, in the eug model is not as an integrated part of the binocular; it could be easily removed from the sight elevation arm.

10x80;80 sight(2);30%


The sights were produced by Carl Zeiss in Jena and it is marked with the war symbol – blc and has own production number. The same sight was used on: some 12 x 60; 5x and 10x by 70 mm binocular and early 25 x 100 and other types of optics.

10x80;80 sight;30%

                                                  The sight for 10 x 80 80˚eug – production number 280606. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

The sight can be used during the day (T in the picture) and night (N) by turning the knob to an appropriate position. It is an inverted V sight.

10x80;80 sight(3);30%


It is possible to increase illumination by turning appropriately the adjustment wheel, built in the sight; the black triangle will be moving down showing thicker V.                                                                         
10x80;80 sight(4);30%

                                           The illuminated sight for 10 x 80 80˚eug – production number 280606. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

The arm with the sight is foldable as well.

10x80;80eug;30%

                                       10 x 80 80˚eug - production number: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

10x80;80eug;in box30%

                                    10 x 80 80˚eug - production number: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

The binocular is in original factory condition. The binocular was in Paris Wehrmacht depot, which after the war it was taken by French Military. In early 1970s French Military organize big auctions of optical equipment. We are the third owner of that binocular since the auction.
The body shape is a little different from others model. On the underneath of the tubes near the objective glass end are flat surfaces. It is difficult to understand why this configuration was produced.

10x80;80eug;body30%

                                    10 x 80 80˚eug - production number: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

In later Optische Präzisions-Werke G.m.b.H., Warschau (eug) production this body shape was not produced. The tubes were straight.

10x80;80 prod no165597;25%

                                               10x80; 80˚ eug Nr 1562 M Prod No 165597; from a collection. Pictured by Anna Vacani

The eug binocular is mounted into one complete unit - the cradle and turntable. The turntable will fit on a tripod with 13 mm spigot.  The mounting is adjustable for altitude (elevation) and azimuth.  The elevation is adjustable to: -20˚ and + 80˚ by the handles.

10x80;80eug;20%

                              10 x 80 80˚eug – prod. No: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection; Elevation mechanism. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

The azimuth is adjustable to 360˚. The scale is marked on the turntable.

10x80;80eug;bubble20%

                     10 x 80 80˚eug – prod. No: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection; Azimuth mechanism (turntable). Copyrights: Anna Vacani

The binocular level can be adjusted by a tripod legs, checking on the circular bubble fitted on the turntable. The elevation and azimuth position can be locked with mechanism fitted in the wooden handles.

10x80;80eug;handle20%


On the right side of the binocular is a knob for eye width control. The distance between the observer’s eyes is set within 56 and 74 mm.
The eyepieces are individually focusing with diopter scales at each eyepiece; focus adjustment settings: 0 to -4 and +8. The viewing angle is 80˚.
As the letter “T” indicated all lenses are coated. The blooming on our binocular is in perfect condition:

10x80;80eug;objectives25%

                                    10 x 80 80˚eug – prod. No: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection; Objectives. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

10x80;80eug;oculars20%

                                       10 x 80 80˚eug – prod. No: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection; Eyepieces. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

In the Carl Zeiss catalogue – 1938 it was told that after removing the rubber eyecups it is possible to use gas mask.
On the body of the prism housing is the plate with explanation of the reticule division. It is very rare to find 10 x 80 80˚binoculars with this plate.
10x80;80eug;reticule50%

                                    10 x 80 80˚eug – prod. No: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection; Reticule plate. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

The binocular has a good weight balance, it is easy to fit into a tripod, and it is effortless to use it.  The approximately weight is – 9, 5 kg.
The binocular has some weakness points. When the objective tube has been hit hard on the front trim ring, it can cause great difficulty to remove the objective.
The elevating handle sometimes will not lock in position and internal tread is striped. This part is not reparable.
The wood handles often are broken or missing.
The metal handle sometimes has been bent.
The turntable bottom bearing has been seen broken off.

III. Internal features of the binocular

The binocular has 6 elements Erfle eyepieces and Amici prism.

As Kevin Karl Kuhne and Sandy Hook, in the article: “The large aperture German and Japanese binoculars of WWII. A comparative study of construction and performance” says: “This system uses a 6 element Erfle eyepiece incorporating three achromats with an apparent field angle of 72 degrees and a real field angle of 7 degrees,  “

10x80;80 Kuhne 30%


And further: “A very large Amici roof prism with 80˚ exit face is incorporated, and the objectives are cemented achromats. All internal optical surfaces are coated”

10x80;80 Amici prism 0%

               Picture from “Military Binoculars and Telescopes for Land, Air and Sea Service” – Dr Hans Seeger, Hamburg 1995; page 353

10x80;80 Amici prism Steve 30%

              Picture from Stephen Rohan book: “Eye of the Wehrmacht; An illustrated guide to The German World War II 10 x 80 Binoculars” Volume I –                                                                         page 91 Amici prism – Carl Zeiss Jena 10 x 80; 80˚

The Amici prism was used in Carl Zeiss -blc 10 x 80 80˚; binoculars. The mount of the glass has a groove which fits into mount. If the prism has given a shock the glass moves backward or forward and brakes part of the grove and some of the prism face is damage.  The result of the shock is visible in the pictures:

10x80;80 blc Amici prism;30%


          10x80;80 blc Amici prism(2);30%            10x80;80 blc Amici prism(3);30%
                                                                                                                      10 x 80; 80 ˚blc Amici prism, in our collection

The eug mount was changed to prevent the damages of the prism. The shape of the prism had changed as well, it nearly the same except the mounting area. In this way it is not possible to exchange the prism from blc and eug models.
The objectives are standard - two elements achromatic cemented construction.
At the bottom of right eyepiece is fitted a reticule. The reticule, in eug models was made in two designs.

10x80;80ProdNo165597;reticule;20%

                               10x80; 80˚ eug Nr 1562 M Prod No 165597; from a collection; the reticule. Pictured by Anna Vacani

10x80;80eug reticule;20%

                                     10 x 80 80˚eug – prod. No: 61893; M IV/I; from our collection; Reticule. Copyrights: Anna Vacani

The binoculars performance is fantastic. The picture is very sharp and with high light transmission. Looking at all basic 10 x 80 models: 20˚; 45˚; 80˚; in our opinion the light transmission is slightly better in the 80˚ than in the others models. Assuming that the binocular is in perfect condition, the performance is the best in the 80˚.
Only internal weaknesses of the binocular 10 x 80; 80 degrees are the prism mount system. In Carl Zeiss and blc produced models the prism mount is more likely to lead to chipped prisms if the binocular is dropped.

IV. Variation between early model - 1938 and later models

 As it was mentioned the eug and blc models have different features from the 1938’ model. The most visible are two features different from model 1938: the sight and illumination system.
The sight has different construction and shape. It was an integral part of the binocular; the sight arm is fitted to the right tube. The sight arm is in vertical position, in this picture from the catalogue. When the sight was not in use the flip-up arm was fully folded, it is visible in the picture from Signal Magazine French edition – F16 August 1941, where is pictured early model.

F16 August 1941 p.12; 13 10x80;80degree (15);25%


F16 August 1941 p.12; 13 10x80;80degree (17);25%

                 The pictures from Signal Magazine – F16 August 1941(in our collection)with an early model Carl Zeiss 10 x 80 - 80˚.

Information under the picture: “At a divisional headquarters, along the Prut river border between Romania and Bessarabia that the Soviet had occupied by force a year ago. General Antonescu and King Michel observe enemy position through the binocular”
                           http://www.binoculars-cinecollectors.com (Literature)

Looking closely to the eug model, it is visible that the illumination system was not the same, as in the both pictures: from catalogue 1938 and from the Signal. The connectors for the cable and the batteries mounting post and strap are not visible.

10x80;80blcSteve;20%

       blc “Flakfernrohr 10 x 80 Sonderausführung A” Prod No 147833; from Dr Stephen Rohan collection; with a special rubber eye cups which fold                                               down; to allowed use wearing eye glasses or gas mask. Copyrights: Dr Stephen Rohan.

In the early model the reticule was only illuminated. In later produced models: eug and blc; new modifications were made which included: new illuminating system for altitude and azimuth and new aiming sight.

                           10x80;80eug;70%     10x80;80eug;bubble70%
                         10 x 80 80˚eug from our collection – illumination system; Copyrights: Anna Vacani

When the illumination arrangements are working the reticule, the elevation indicator (Höhe) and azimuth indicator on turntable are illuminated.  It is possible to adjust the brightness. The changes were applied in 1940. It was described in a document published by Carl Zeiss Jena, for official use only. In the document drawings are showing all new features.

Carl Zeiss insrt.20%

                                                            The new cable for the new model

Carl Zeiss insrt.30%


                                                                       New illuminating system and new type of the sight


10x80;80 Carl Zeiss instr;20%

             Carl Zeiss document 1940 – Binoculars (observation telescope) 10 x 80 (with 80 angle viewing); copy in our collection.

The document was edited by the High Command of the Navy, Berlin 1940 - (Herausgegeben vom Oberkommando der Kriegsmarine, Berlin 1940). The development of the illumination system could be explained as the binocular may well be easily used, for the sky observation, during the night as well. Presumably, the changes were made after experiments were completed in The Luftwaffe Test Center, in Rechlin.
Next different feature is the turntable: the diameter and scale measure. The early version has bigger plate, and it is 20 cm (8 inches) diameter.  New models are fitted with 16 cm (app. 6 inches) diameter of the turntable. The scale on the plate is specified in grads of the early models, and it is marked: 0 - 64 grads (equivalent of 360˚).  The later models the scale is marked in 0 - 360˚.

Steve 10x80;8020%

    blc “Flakfernrohr 10 x 80 Sonderausführung A” Prod No 147833; from Dr Stephen Rohan collection; the turntable; Copyrights: Dr Stephen Rohan.

The circular bubble is fitted on the turntable, in early models as well.

Carl Zeiss Jena 10x80;80dgr (7)Rechlin;20%

                           10x80; 80˚ Carl Zeiss Jena; prod No 68678 from Dr Stephen Rohan collection; Copyright: Dr Stephen Rohan

Presumably, both models were produced during the same period.  It is possible to draw this conclusion.

Looking at the picture in Stephen Rohan book, page 79; we can see the binocular fitted with old features, but marked “blc”. When the war codes where introduced in May 1941. 
Look: http://www.binoculars-cinecollectors.com/html/body_binoculars.html#TheListOfLiterature  (In German Language, poz.1) 

As Kevin Karl Kuhne and Sandy Hook, in the article: “The large aperture German and Japanese binoculars of WWII. A comparative study of construction and performance” says: “The eug model has an improved prism mount and is much less prone to chipping of prism compared with the blc model”.

 


V. Accessories

Our binocular is in original wood case for 10 x 80; 80˚.

Case 10x80;80dgr;20%

                      10 x 80 80˚eug from our collection – binocular in the case and accessories; Copyrights: Anna Vacani

Overall case dimensions:
-         Length:  50 cm (20 in);
-         Width:  41 cm (16);
-         Height: 30 cm (12 in);
-         Weight: 13, 6 kg (30 lb).

In the case is a separate wood box contains: three spare bulbs, the lightening cable and the key for the case.
The battery case is located next to that wood box.
The key is in the original Carl Zeiss envelop, described in three languages:

Key 10x80;80dgr;20%


Next accessories are two pair of removable filters.

Filters 10x80;80dgr;20%


It is original complete.  The filters container suggested it should have three pair of filters, but on the contents list it is specified that in the case is only two filters pair. 

Box-list 10x80;80dgr;20%



In the case should be, as the list specified: a cleaning cloth; a brush; and a description, but they are missing in our collection.


We hope this article contains all expected information. If the readers would like to share their knowledge and any additional information about these models, it will be nice to hear.



[1]Military Binoculars and Telescopes for Land, Air and Sea Service – Dr Hans Seeger, Hamburg 1995; page 252

[1]Eye of the Wehrmacht; An illustrated guide to The German World War II 10 x 80 Binoculars” Volume I – by Stephen Rohan; California 1996 




[1] German Military Technology: The Optical Equipment. Descriptive documents circulated by Carl Zeiss, Jena, between 1930 and 1940. Edited by: Dr. Hans T.Seeger, Hamburg
[1]Eye of the Wehrmacht; An illustrated guide to The German World War II 10 x 80 Binoculars” Volume I – by Stephen Rohan; California 1996 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Page Back                                                  Unusual             Pages   (1)   (2)   (3)   (4)   (5)   (6)   (7)   (8)  (8a) (11)  (12)